28
Jul

The Commercial Interior Design

Attributes Of A Commercial Interior Design

Commercial Interior Design Basics

The interior design of a home is essentially about the owner’s style and preference. It may have unique structural elements, themes, and patterns, but in the end, the overall design has been made according to the owner’s taste. But such is not the case with a commercial interior design. With a commercial setting, the interior design is created with the establishment’s target customers in mind.

Commercial establishments are simply places of business or facilities that serve business purposes. These include hotels, restaurants, music bars, clothing shops, hardware stores, and even corporate offices. These may also include industrial properties where the business’ products are manufactured, such as factories. Because these places aim to attract clients and customers, the interior design must conform to the clients’ discernment.

For example, a cocktail bar that caters to corporate executives and professionals after office hours would strive to attract their targeted patrons with urbane design and stylish decors. Garish and shoddy motif may give off the impression that the bar is cheap and substandard. The clients may not have a direct say to the interior design while it is being planned, but nevertheless, the result should have their approval.

Residential And Commercial Interior Design

In creating an interior design for a residential property, the interior designer must take into consideration the client or the owner’s preference and comfort. As it is the place wherein the owner takes refuge after a long day at work, the home should exude a comforting atmosphere. This includes fixtures and furniture, light settings, and colour schemes that are pleasant and soothing to the owner’s senses.

But in a commercial interior design, the aesthetic look must go hand in hand with functionality. The attractiveness of a place can lure customers in, but it won’t be able to keep them interested for long if it can’t give what the customers want. A coffee shop may draw in customers because it has attractive motif, but if it has poorly thought out design in terms of functionality, its customers aren’t likely to return.